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By Manica Hauptman, Life Coach and Graduate of the Jay Shetty Certification School

We love to be busy. In a culture where “busyness” has been celebrated for so long, it’s  difficult to change how we perceive it and what value we attach to it. We praise ourselves  for how extremely busy we are, tell our colleagues about back-to-back meetings and feel very successful and accomplished.

Connect with Manica

How come I am now coaching busy women? To be completely honest: I actually un-niched, against all marketing advice. When I graduated, I made myself busy (again) by trying to niche down. I created so much drama around it, that I needed to take a break. I then simply went with what feels aligned with me right now. It will probably change over time, but for now I am happy coaching everybody on everything.  

Regardless of that, it is mostly busy women that find me. I guess it is because of who I was (and sometimes still am). It may be that they see themselves in my story. I have many busy women in my network. It is the midlife, when women work, have kids, pets, households, and love getting support and guidance.

I never give advice; everyone is different and their "busyness" has different roots that they need to uncover. We dig deep and only then start to practice slowing down, being present, letting go of hustle and control, and living with more ease. It is a choice one has to make every day, over and over again.

For everyone in stress and overdrive I am offering the following: “In 2022 I am slowing down, doing less and living with ease.” 

Relax, be true, be you and don’t forget to have fun!

Relax, be true, be you and
don’t forget to have fun!

So, when you get to be busy, ask yourself:

  • How does being busy serve me?

  • What am I seeking? Approval, validation?

  • Where can I get all this if I slow down?

  • Am I trying to escape my uncomfortable thoughts and feelings?

  • What will I uncover if I sit still, in silence, doing nothing?

Be honest with yourself. Try to consider the consequences of being in high gear all the time. What will happen to your health, your relationships, your contentment and joy?

While overtly busy with my job, life, and kids, I finally decided to “stop” just before I just before a complete burn- and break-down, I decided to stop. A door opened for me; a new opportunity to create a shift. I took a career break and I followed my husband to another country. We moved and I was free. I was certified as a yoga instructor, something I always wanted to do, and then as a life coach.

I joined the Jay Shetty Certification School at the very beginning. I took a leap of faith, since the school was still fairly new. But it felt right and it was one of the best decisions ever. The course, the certification and the work I have been doing since changed me forever. I got to know myself really well–maybe for the first time in my life–at the age of 46. 

It has been an inspiring, challenging and exciting journey, though not always easy, and often painful and uncomfortable.

Most of us know that “busyness” has nothing to do with productivity or the quality of our work, success, or happiness in life, but we keep soldering on. 

As women, we often pride ourselves in how much we can accomplish in a day: job, kids, household, pets, relationships, and so much more. This is where our “busyness” often interacts with our sense of duty and social roles we play. We sometimes venture into victimhood (“no one is touching the laundry, except me…”), confusing it with a sense of control (yes, over laundry!) or our need to gather evidence to complain later on.

Another significant aspect of us deciding to keep ourselves busy is “escaping us.”

I still remember when my kids were very small and I was working full time, taking care of the house, our children, and our dog while my husband worked abroad. I fell into all the traps of becoming super busy. I enjoyed being celebrated by everyone around me for how much I could do in a day. They said I was a “wonder woman,” while on the inside I was exhausted. 

I could have had more help, and I did have some, just not enough. Much later I realized that I refused to get more help so I could continue to write that particular story: of a super busy woman, capable of doing it all, basking in admiration. In reality, I was not present with my kids. I stifled my creativity and I let go of all the joy and fun in my life. I made myself too tired to just be! I was escaping my own thoughts, my own emotions, being busy with everything else that did not really matter that much.

We love to be busy. In a culture where “busyness” has been celebrated for so long, it’s  difficult to change how we perceive it and what value we attach to it. We praise ourselves  for how extremely busy we are, tell our colleagues about back-to-back meetings and feel very successful and accomplished.

Connect with Manica

How come I am now coaching busy women? To be completely honest: I actually un-niched, against all marketing advice. When I graduated, I made myself busy (again) by trying to niche down. I created so much drama around it, that I needed to take a break. I then simply went with what feels aligned with me right now. It will probably change over time, but for now I am happy coaching everybody on everything.  

Regardless of that, it is mostly busy women that find me. I guess it is because of who I was (and sometimes still am). It may be that they see themselves in my story. I have many busy women in my network. It is the midlife, when women work, have kids, pets, households, and love getting support and guidance.

I never give advice; everyone is different and their "busyness" has different roots that they need to uncover. We dig deep and only then start to practice slowing down, being present, letting go of hustle and control, and living with more ease. It is a choice one has to make every day, over and over again.

For everyone in stress and overdrive I am offering the following: “In 2022 I am slowing down, doing less and living with ease.” 

Relax, be true, be you and don’t forget to have fun!

Relax, be true, be you and
don’t forget to have fun!

Be honest with yourself. Try to consider the consequences of being in high gear all the time. What will happen to your health, your relationships, your contentment and joy?

While overtly busy with my job, life, and kids, I finally decided to “stop” just before I just before a complete burn- and break-down, I decided to stop. A door opened for me; a new opportunity to create a shift. I took a career break and I followed my husband to another country. We moved and I was free. I was certified as a yoga instructor, something I always wanted to do, and then as a life coach.

I joined the Jay Shetty Certification School at the very beginning. I took a leap of faith, since the school was still fairly new. But it felt right and it was one of the best decisions ever. The course, the certification and the work I have been doing since changed me forever. I got to know myself really well–maybe for the first time in my life–at the age of 46. 

It has been an inspiring, challenging and exciting journey, though not always easy, and often painful and uncomfortable.

  • How does being busy serve me?

  • What am I seeking? Approval, validation?

  • Where can I get all this if I slow down?

  • Am I trying to escape my uncomfortable thoughts and feelings?

  • What will I uncover if I sit still, in silence, doing nothing?

So, when you get
to be busy, ask yourself:

Most of us know that “busyness” has nothing to do with productivity or the quality of our work, success, or happiness in life, but we keep soldering on. 

As women, we often pride ourselves in how much we can accomplish in a day: job, kids, household, pets, relationships, and so much more. This is where our “busyness” often interacts with our sense of duty and social roles we play. We sometimes venture into victimhood (“no one is touching the laundry, except me…”), confusing it with a sense of control (yes, over laundry!) or our need to gather evidence to complain later on.

Another significant aspect of us deciding to keep ourselves busy is “escaping us.”

I still remember when my kids were very small and I was working full time, taking care of the house, our children, and our dog while my husband worked abroad. I fell into all the traps of becoming super busy. I enjoyed being celebrated by everyone around me for how much I could do in a day. They said I was a “wonder woman,” while on the inside I was exhausted. 

I could have had more help, and I did have some, just not enough. Much later I realized that I refused to get more help so I could continue to write that particular story: of a super busy woman, capable of doing it all, basking in admiration. In reality, I was not present with my kids. I stifled my creativity and I let go of all the joy and fun in my life. I made myself too tired to just be! I was escaping my own thoughts, my own emotions, being busy with everything else that did not really matter that much.

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