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We have interviewed Kevin, our alumnus and Acceptance and Transformation coach. Read about his experience with the Jay Shetty Certification School and about his journey of becoming a successful coach.

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Kevin used to work in a corporate office and often felt like he wasn’t fitting in due to his introverted personality. Over the years, he was receiving hints to become a coach, but he had always put that thought to rest. 

Until one day... when he received a message that a coaching certification program was going to be offered through the Jay Shetty Certification School. For him that was a sign that his destiny was about to change.

Today Kevin works mostly with introverted clients from all over the world as an Acceptance and Transformation coach. 

Through his own lifelong experience of living with an introverted nature combined with his knowledge and skills as a life coach, his coaching approach is focused on helping introverts see their introverted nature as an asset instead of a liability. 

1. When and why did you decide to become a coach?

The path to becoming a coach has been building for quite some time, I just wasn’t aware of it. When I received a message that a coaching certification program was going to be offered through the Jay Shetty Certification School, I decided that I had received enough hints over the past two years and finally made the decision to step into coaching as a new exciting career.

3. Please describe your coaching approach.

My coaching approach centers around clients accepting themselves. Obvious as
that might seem at first glance, when you dig a bit deeper, you’ll find that self-acceptance is a serious obstacle for many people to live the life they want, so my entire coaching process is to help clients reach a state of self-acceptance.

7. What is your biggest failure, and what did you learn from it?

Believing that to be happy I needed to conform to the definition of success and values of Western society. It taught me that, to define success and find my values,
I needed to search deeply inside myself instead of looking to the outside world. It’s probably the most important and liberating thing I have ever done.

5. Who are your coaching clients, and what challenges do they                 usually bring to your coaching sessions? 

My clients are people who are more introverted, and their greatest challenge is to
see their introverted nature and behavioral preferences as an advantage instead
of something that’s holding them back. Essentially it comes down to accepting themselves as they are, being okay with who they are, and letting that empower them.

You can connect with Kevin on his website

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2. What’s something people seem to misunderstand about you when     you tell them you are a coach?

Nothing that comes to mind really. I have a calm demeanor and the way I behave and look at life resulted in people around me having seen coaching as my path long before I did. Nobody is really surprised when they find out I’m a coach. 

4. What is one thing that your coaching approach did for your
    client you didn’t expect? 

When you’re into self-development it’s easy to take things for granted, so I had not anticipated how impactful small steps can be for a client’s sense of self-worth and how clients find profound joy and happiness in seemingly small realizations.

6. What’s one thing you wish you had known when you became
    a coach? 

That coaching is less complicated than I thought. That might sound a bit contradicting because coaching being less complicated is a good thing but understanding that up front would have eased my mind and I would have felt less pressure. Sure, a good part of coaching is about skills that you develop over time but realizing that each coach has their own style that’s right for them and that as long as you are genuine, authentic, and curious you’ll be fine. The skills will grow over time.

We recently  asked Kevin some questions about his journey and his approach to coaching and wanted to share his insights with you.

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Prefer to watch the interview video instead?
Watch the interview here:

Meet our alumnus:
Kevin
Zoeteman

We have interviewed Kevin, our alumnus and Acceptance and Transformation coach. Read about his experience with the Jay Shetty Certification School and about his journey of becoming a successful coach.

image003_4.jpg

Kevin used to work in a corporate office and often felt like he wasn’t fitting in due to his introverted personality. Over the years, he was receiving hints to become a coach, but he had always put that thought to rest. 

Until one day... when he received a message that a coaching certification program was going to be offered through the Jay Shetty Certification School. For him that was a sign that his destiny was about to change.

Today Kevin works mostly with introverted clients from all over the world as an Acceptance and Transformation coach. 

Through his own lifelong experience of living with an introverted nature combined with his knowledge and skills as a life coach, his coaching approach is focused on helping introverts see their introverted nature as an asset instead of a liability. 

We recently  asked Kevin some questions about his journey and his approach to coaching and wanted to share his insights with you.

questionmarks.png

1. When and why did you decide to become a coach?

The path to becoming a coach has been building for quite some time, I just wasn’t aware of it. When I received a message that a coaching certification program was going to be offered through the Jay Shetty Certification School, I decided that I had received enough hints over the past two years and finally made the decision to step into coaching as a new exciting career.

2. What’s something people seem to misunderstand about     you when you tell them you are a coach?

Nothing that comes to mind really. I have a calm demeanor and the way I behave and look at life resulted in people around me having seen coaching as my path long before I did. Nobody is really surprised when they find out I’m a coach. 

3. Please describe your coaching approach.

My coaching approach centers around clients accepting themselves. Obvious as
that might seem at first glance, when you dig a bit deeper, you’ll find that self-acceptance is a serious obstacle for many people to live the life they want, so my entire coaching process is to help clients reach a state of self-acceptance.

4. What is one thing that your coaching approach did
    for your client that you didn’t expect? 

When you’re into self-development it’s easy to take things for granted, so I had not anticipated how impactful small steps can be for a client’s sense of self-worth and how clients find profound joy and happiness in seemingly small realizations.

5. Who are your coaching clients, and what challenges
    do they usually bring to your coaching? 

My clients are people who are more introverted, and their greatest challenge is to see their introverted nature and behavioral preferences as an advantage instead of something that’s holding them back. Essentially it comes down to accepting themselves as they are, being okay with who they are, and letting that empower them.

6. What’s one thing you wish you had known when
    you became a coach? 

That coaching is less complicated than I thought. That might sound a bit contradicting because coaching being less complicated is a good thing but understanding that up front would have eased my mind and I would have felt less pressure. Sure, a good part of coaching is about skills that you develop over time but realizing that each coach has their own style that’s right for them and that as long as you are genuine, authentic, and curious you’ll be fine. The skills will grow over time.

7. What is your biggest failure, and what did you learn
    from it?

Believing that to be happy I needed to conform to the definition of success and values of Western society. It taught me that, to define success and find my values,
I needed to search deeply inside myself instead of looking to the outside world. It’s probably the most important and liberating thing I have ever done.

Prefer to watch the interview video instead?
Watch the interview here:

You can connect with Kevin on his website

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website_1.png (copy2)

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