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In each issue, we define and explain three key words relevant to our monthly theme. Since this month is all about communication, we cover three concepts that can help you become a better communicator. Non-verbal communication, the 7 Cs of communication, and cognitive dissonance are in the spotlight in this edition.

WISDOM
-PEDIA

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The concept of non-verbal communication is an umbrella term used to describe any messages that are communicated in ways other than words. These include body language (e.g., eye contact, facial expressions, movements), posture, gestures, tone of voice, speech pace, and appearance (e.g., dress, adornments, tattoos, tidiness).

Albert Mehrabian proposed the 7-38-55 rule whereby 7% of meaning is communicated through words and 38% through the voice tone, speed, volume, and word emphasis. The largest proportion of the message, 55%, is conveyed through body language.(1)

Body language cues are often subtle and subconscious, therefore, any signs that give additional information or messages that conflict with what the speaker is saying are significant to the observer.

Non-verbal Communication

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According to communication specialists,(2) there are seven principles to adhere to when you want to ensure you communicate effectively with someone. The same characteristics apply in the coaching relationship. When a coach learns and applies these aspects, the client will know you are hearing and understanding what they are trying to convey. This recognition builds a strong rapport and foundation of trust, which is the biggest determinant of a successful coaching process. 

The 7 Cs represent the qualities effective communication has, namely being clear, correct, complete, concrete, concise, coherent, and courteous.


Clear – The purpose and intent of your message should be clear to the client. Separate questions, goals, or facts.

Correct – Ensure to use correct facts and language to avoid distracting your client and reducing your credibility. Avoid biases, opinions, and assumptions.

Complete – Giving the recipient all the information they need to reach a conclusion.

Concrete – Information must be specific and flow logically toward an outcome.

Concise – Keep your messages as short, simple, and non-repetitive as possible to serve the intent and purpose.

Coherent – Communicate consistently according to style, tone, language, and content.

Courteous – Show respect, consideration, and honesty in your communication.

A coach who is able to master and demonstrate these seven qualities of communication is in the best position to build trust with his or her client and guide the client to their desired outcome.

7Cs of Communication

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Dr. Joan Swart is the Head of Curriculum and a Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School

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References: 

1Mehrabian, Albert. Silent Messages: Implicit Communication of Emotions and Attitudes. Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1981. 

2Cutlip, Scott M., and Allen H. Center. Effective Public Relations: Pathways to Public Favor. Prentice-Hall, 1957. 

3Festinger, Leon. “Cognitive Dissonance.” Scientific American, vol. 207, no. 4, 1962, pp. 93–106., doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1062-93. 




When a person holds conflicting beliefs, ideas, or thoughts, they are in a state of cognitive dissonance.(3) When they have to make a decision or do something that activates these contradictory values, the result is a feeling of discomfort that can lead to a rash or unhelpful decision or behavior. There are several ways that cognitive dissonance happens for many people in everyday life.

One example is an animal lover who eats meat. You may enjoy meat products or believe that a meat-free diet is not optimal for you, but you know that many animals are treated inhumanely in the process. Another common occurrence of cognitive dissonance is valuing your life and knowing that exercise benefits your health, but you also find various excuses to not  go to the gym.

In each of these, and many other examples, a person would reduce their mental and emotional discomfort by compromising on one or more of their beliefs to find a middle ground that they feel works for them. For instance, the meat eater may commit to buying free range products and the gym member may opt to walk in their local park over weekends.

A person in a state of cognitive dissonance may appear to be indecisive, procrastinating, or inconsistent to an observer such as a coach. When there is evidence of the presence of conflicting thoughts, beliefs, or values, a good coach will identify and challenge these to help the client find their acceptable middle ground.

Cognitive Dissonance

In each issue, we define and explain three key words relevant to our monthly theme. Since this month is all about communication, we cover three concepts that can help you become a better communicator. Non-verbal communication, the 7 Cs of communication, and cognitive dissonance are in the spotlight in this edition.

WISDOM
-PEDIA

1.png

The concept of non-verbal communication is an umbrella term used to describe any messages that are communicated in ways other than words. These include body language (e.g., eye contact, facial expressions, movements), posture, gestures, tone of voice, speech pace, and appearance (e.g., dress, adornments, tattoos, tidiness).

Albert Mehrabian proposed the 7-38-55 rule whereby 7% of meaning is communicated through words and 38% through the voice tone, speed, volume, and word emphasis. The largest proportion of the message, 55%, is conveyed through body language.(1)

Body language cues are often subtle and subconscious, therefore, any signs that give additional information or messages that conflict with what the speaker is saying are significant to the observer.

Non-verbal Communication

2.png

According to communication specialists,(2) there are seven principles to adhere to when you want to ensure you communicate effectively with someone. The same characteristics apply in the coaching relationship. When a coach learns and applies these aspects, the client will know you are hearing and understanding what they are trying to convey. This recognition builds a strong rapport and foundation of trust, which is the biggest determinant of a successful coaching process. 

The 7 Cs represent the qualities effective communication has, namely being clear, correct, complete, concrete, concise, coherent, and courteous.


Clear – The purpose and intent of your message should be clear to the client. Separate questions, goals, or facts.

Correct – Ensure to use correct facts and language to avoid distracting your client and reducing your credibility. Avoid biases, opinions, and assumptions.

Complete – Giving the recipient all the information they need to reach a conclusion.

Concrete – Information must be specific and flow logically toward an outcome.

Concise – Keep your messages as short, simple, and non-repetitive as possible to serve the intent and purpose.

Coherent – Communicate consistently according to style, tone, language, and content.

Courteous – Show respect, consideration, and honesty in your communication.

A coach who is able to master and demonstrate these seven qualities of communication is in the best position to build trust with his or her client and guide the client to their desired outcome.

7Cs of Communication

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When a person holds conflicting beliefs, ideas, or thoughts, they are in a state of cognitive dissonance.(3) When they have to make a decision or do something that activates these contradictory values, the result is a feeling of discomfort that can lead to a rash or unhelpful decision or behavior. There are several ways that cognitive dissonance happens for many people in everyday life.

One example is an animal lover who eats meat. You may enjoy meat products or believe that a meat-free diet is not optimal for you, but you know that many animals are treated inhumanely in the process. Another common occurrence of cognitive dissonance is valuing your life and knowing that exercise benefits your health, but you also find various excuses to not  go to the gym.

In each of these, and many other examples, a person would reduce their mental and emotional discomfort by compromising on one or more of their beliefs to find a middle ground that they feel works for them. For instance, the meat eater may commit to buying free range products and the gym member may opt to walk in their local park over weekends.

A person in a state of cognitive dissonance may appear to be indecisive, procrastinating, or inconsistent to an observer such as a coach. When there is evidence of the presence of conflicting thoughts, beliefs, or values, a good coach will identify and challenge these to help the client find their acceptable middle ground.

Cognitive Dissonance

3.png

Dr. Joan Swart is the Head of Curriculum and a Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School

joan_copy.png

References: 

1Mehrabian, Albert. Silent Messages: Implicit Communication of Emotions and Attitudes. Wadsworth Pub. Co., 1981. 

2Cutlip, Scott M., and Allen H. Center. Effective Public Relations: Pathways to Public Favor. Prentice-Hall, 1957. 

3Festinger, Leon. “Cognitive Dissonance.” Scientific American, vol. 207, no. 4, 1962, pp. 93–106., doi:10.1038/scientificamerican1062-93. 




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