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Viraj
Oza


SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

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This month, we speak with Viraj Oza, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School. Read below to learn about his journey as a coach, his coaching approach, and what every new coach should know.

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Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

A couple of years ago, I set an intention of wanting to be a billionaire – by the number of lives I impact. I wanted to pay forward and share a lot of what I learned and unlearned through my personal and professional training and growth developmental journey.

First, I needed to (to paraphrase Gandhi), “Become the change I wanted to see in the world.” Making a number of lifestyle changes which included going plant-based (animals counted in that billion!) and transitioned out of the corporate world to become a “Dadpreneur” and an accredited life coach. 

These changes didn’t go unnoticed. During this period, I was also an active founding member of Jay’s Genius Community and was contributing by helping to connect members to one another worldwide through the Meetups. All of what I was doing perfectly aligned with the ethos, mission and vision of the Jay Shetty Certification School.

Last year, I came to know about the school, and was invited to facilitate “The Pathway Program,” which was a great success. Becoming a coaching supervisor felt so right!

This isn’t just a coaching school, it’s a mission to create an exciting future for humanity where everyone wins. And for me, while I can only coach a limited number of people myself, I can also serve and mentor coaches and make that ripple even bigger!


What is your coaching approach/niche?

I am a mindset and performance coach, guiding high performers, social entrepreneurs, and change makers to cause impact in their own way in the world and to find harmony between their home and work lives.

My emphasis on mindset is to facilitate the discovery of blind spots that have caused limiting beliefs or blocks, bringing them to awareness so my clients can transform their perspective, and create lasting breakthroughs. My focus on performance is to build on this and guide my clients to choose the actions they determine they need to perform, identify the resources they can leverage, and grow from exactly where they are. And doing this while deeply connecting them to their greater “Why” and purpose, and for them to measure themselves against their own metric of success.

At a macro level, my coaching framework is bespoke to each individual I work with. It is a blend of ontological principles, spirituality (mainly from the Bhagavad Gita), mindfulness, physiology, scientific models, intuition, and personal experience from the range of personal and professional development and training I’ve completed in all these areas.

Of course, I’m hugely inspired by Jay, from whom I’ve developed and grown through his coaching, and by the work of Simon Sinek and James Clear.

Viraj Oza is a supervisor at the
Jay Shetty Certification School.

New image
New image New image

A lot of what we see on social media is branded as coaching-  motivational memes, hyped up videos, and messages that are one size fit all: “Do this thing and your life will change”. While this is valuable and educational, it is more in the realm of mentoring and influencing. Coaching is really what you don’t see online – it’s that 1:1 powerful interaction where one question can transform some someone’s life in a way that is totally intangible; that liberates and empowers people – because there isn’t anything wrong, or needs to be fixed.

What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

To bring yourself fully to every coaching conversation like it’s a blank canvas. It isn’t on your shoulders as a coach to find the action you think will cause the shift for the client. Rather through your presence, curiosity and inquisitiveness to create the space for clients to think, feel, and speak out loud to find the answers within, using reflective questioning and powerful listening. Serving your clients over wanting to please.

Why is this so important?

We’re taught and given advice our entire lives, yet we never act on it meaningfully. A lack of insight is not the issue most face. It’s about looking beyond the quick-fix, survival-oriented choices we make and switching to creating a future that’s inspiring and grounded in what really matters, with what is already known. And for our clients, only they know what that really is. Once that connection is made, they can be, do, and have it all on their terms - not through someone else’s lens or conditioning.

What are the most common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

That coaches will give you great advice, teach you what they know and will pump you up to walk on fire or smash through glass.

A lot of what we see on social media is branded as coaching- motivational memes, hyped up videos, and messages that are one size fit all: “Do this thing and your life will change”. While this is valuable and educational, it is more in the realm of mentoring and influencing.

Coaching is really what you don’t see online – it’s that 1:1 powerful interaction where one question can transform some someone’s life in a way that is totally intangible; that liberates and empowers people – because there isn’t anything wrong, or needs to be fixed.


What are the most common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

I’m not too sure of many. Perhaps the perception is that it just looks for faults. I liken coaching supervision to having another pair of eyes and ears on a session to give feedback to the coach. This is a big win-win for the client to capture what may have been missed or could serve in a later session.

Elements of mentoring and coaching blended in to help upskill the coach and their confidence and energy. I’m definitely getting a supervisor for myself!


What is your supervision approach?

I look for how a coach can structurally and qualitatively work smarter to identify and follow the key thread and stay within the coaching boundaries for maximum effectiveness for them and their client.

I listen to the client like I am coaching them, gauging the level of awareness they are able to raise and the access that it gives them in creating habits and goals for a future worthy of their greatness and resourcefulness without being led to it.

At first, my main focus is on the session structure. How present are both coach and client, and has a clear intention/agreement been established for the session? Is the conversation reflective and forward moving? Are tools being utilized correctly in sessions to yield insights from the client? Have they created a congruent goal and accountability structure? Are coaching standards and ethics being maintained?

Qualitatively is where I can give the most value in observing and highlighting how the emotions stemming from the client affect the coach and vice versa.

Also, what is the quality of the open and reflective questioning to establish what’s working, not working and missing – pattern recognition and how this all occurs for the client, in their worldview and from what source? Is the coach able to guide, listen and reflect back as a mirror for the client to be held accountable, empowered, and connected to their next steps, with the coach remaining detached from “getting their client over the line” though giving advice. Finally, how does the client feel at the end of the call?

Finally, looking out for some of the client’s and coach’s blind spots – what may have been missed? In doing so, by using time stamps and sharing practical recommendations and reflections through video feedback, I champion the strengths and highlight growth opportunities in skillset and mindset for the coach.


What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020

So many! Regardless of what may be going on “out there in the world,” when people commit to something greater than themselves, anything is possible, and everything is transformable. The students are so inspirational. Everything from witnessing them go through supervision to certification in their final exam is a blessing. My own performance as a coach has also grown from their example and dedication to serve. Despite what we see in the media, great things are happening, and I am proud to be a part of the shift.

New image

Viraj
Oza


This month, we speak with Viraj Oza, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School. Read below to learn about his journey as a coach, his coaching approach, and what every new coach should know.

SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

A couple of years ago, I set an intention of wanting to be a billionaire – by the number of lives I impact. I wanted to pay forward and share a lot of what I learned and unlearned through my personal and professional training and growth developmental journey.

First, I needed to (to paraphrase Gandhi), “Become the change I wanted to see in the world.” Making a number of lifestyle changes which included going plant-based (animals counted in that billion!) and transitioned out of the corporate world to become a “Dadpreneur” and an accredited life coach. 

These changes didn’t go unnoticed. During this period, I was also an active founding member of Jay’s Genius Community and was contributing by helping to connect members to one another worldwide through the Meetups. All of what I was doing perfectly aligned with the ethos, mission and vision of the Jay Shetty Certification School.

Last year, I came to know about the school, and was invited to facilitate “The Pathway Program,” which was a great success. Becoming a coaching supervisor felt so right!

This isn’t just a coaching school, it’s a mission to create an exciting future for humanity where everyone wins. And for me, while I can only coach a limited number of people myself, I can also serve and mentor coaches and make that ripple even bigger!


What is your coaching approach/niche?

I am a mindset and performance coach, guiding high performers, social entrepreneurs, and change makers to cause impact in their own way in the world and to find harmony between their home and work lives.

My emphasis on mindset is to facilitate the discovery of blind spots that have caused limiting beliefs or blocks, bringing them to awareness so my clients can transform their perspective, and create lasting breakthroughs. My focus on performance is to build on this and guide my clients to choose the actions they determine they need to perform, identify the resources they can leverage, and grow from exactly where they are. And doing this while deeply connecting them to their greater “Why” and purpose, and for them to measure themselves against their own metric of success.

At a macro level, my coaching framework is bespoke to each individual I work with. It is a blend of ontological principles, spirituality (mainly from the Bhagavad Gita), mindfulness, physiology, scientific models, intuition, and personal experience from the range of personal and professional development and training I’ve completed in all these areas.

Of course, I’m hugely inspired by Jay, from whom I’ve developed and grown through his coaching, and by the work of Simon Sinek and James Clear.

Viraj Oza is a supervisor at the
Jay Shetty Certification School.

New image
New image New image

A lot of what we see on social media is branded as coaching-  motivational memes, hyped up videos, and messages that are one size fit all: “Do this thing and your life will change”. While this is valuable and educational, it is more in the realm of mentoring and influencing.

New image

What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

To bring yourself fully to every coaching conversation like it’s a blank canvas. It isn’t on your shoulders as a coach to find the action you think will cause the shift for the client. Rather through your presence, curiosity and inquisitiveness to create the space for clients to think, feel, and speak out loud to find the answers within, using reflective questioning and powerful listening. Serving your clients over wanting to please.

Why is this so important?

We’re taught and given advice our entire lives, yet we never act on it meaningfully. A lack of insight is not the issue most face. It’s about looking beyond the quick-fix, survival-oriented choices we make and switching to creating a future that’s inspiring and grounded in what really matters, with what is already known. And for our clients, only they know what that really is. Once that connection is made, they can be, do, and have it all on their terms - not through someone else’s lens or conditioning.

What are the most common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

That coaches will give you great advice, teach you what they know and will pump you up to walk on fire or smash through glass.

A lot of what we see on social media is branded as coaching- motivational memes, hyped up videos, and messages that are one size fit all: “Do this thing and your life will change”. While this is valuable and educational, it is more in the realm of mentoring and influencing.

Coaching is really what you don’t see online – it’s that 1:1 powerful interaction where one question can transform some someone’s life in a way that is totally intangible; that liberates and empowers people – because there isn’t anything wrong, or needs to be fixed.


What are the most common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

I’m not too sure of many. Perhaps the perception is that it just looks for faults. I liken coaching supervision to having another pair of eyes and ears on a session to give feedback to the coach. This is a big win-win for the client to capture what may have been missed or could serve in a later session.

Elements of mentoring and coaching blended in to help upskill the coach and their confidence and energy. I’m definitely getting a supervisor for myself!


What is your supervision approach?

I look for how a coach can structurally and qualitatively work smarter to identify and follow the key thread and stay within the coaching boundaries for maximum effectiveness for them and their client.

I listen to the client like I am coaching them, gauging the level of awareness they are able to raise and the access that it gives them in creating habits and goals for a future worthy of their greatness and resourcefulness without being led to it.

At first, my main focus is on the session structure. How present are both coach and client, and has a clear intention/agreement been established for the session? Is the conversation reflective and forward moving? Are tools being utilized correctly in sessions to yield insights from the client? Have they created a congruent goal and accountability structure? Are coaching standards and ethics being maintained?

Qualitatively is where I can give the most value in observing and highlighting how the emotions stemming from the client affect the coach and vice versa.

Also, what is the quality of the open and reflective questioning to establish what’s working, not working and missing – pattern recognition and how this all occurs for the client, in their worldview and from what source? Is the coach able to guide, listen and reflect back as a mirror for the client to be held accountable, empowered, and connected to their next steps, with the coach remaining detached from “getting their client over the line” though giving advice. Finally, how does the client feel at the end of the call?

Finally, looking out for some of the client’s and coach’s blind spots – what may have been missed? In doing so, by using time stamps and sharing practical recommendations and reflections through video feedback, I champion the strengths and highlight growth opportunities in skillset and mindset for the coach.


What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020

So many! Regardless of what may be going on “out there in the world,” when people commit to something greater than themselves, anything is possible, and everything is transformable. The students are so inspirational. Everything from witnessing them go through supervision to certification in their final exam is a blessing. My own performance as a coach has also grown from their example and dedication to serve. Despite what we see in the media, great things are happening, and I am proud to be a part of the shift.

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