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In each issue, we define and explain three key words relevant to our monthly theme. Habits, procrastination, and self-management are in the spotlight of this edition.

WISDOM
-PEDIA

Prefer to listen to this article?

A habit, by definition, is a regularly repeated, learned behavior that requires little to no thought. 

All habits are operated by the subconscious mind but developing a habit can either happen consciously or unconsciously.

  1. Unconsciously developed habits are the ones that we develop without paying much attention. They are not necessarily useful, though! They could be stimulated by social programming, unrevised misconceptions, assumptions and, as a result, can be out-of-place, misguided, or wasteful.

  2. Consciously developed habits, on the other hand, are the ones that we deliberately choose to develop, following new awareness, realizations, revelations, and growth. These positive habits stimulate our self-development and ability to serve others.

Habits

Procrastination is the avoidance of doing a task that needs to be accomplished by a certain deadline. It could be further described as a habitual or intentional delay of starting or finishing a task despite knowing it might have negative consequences.

There are four types of or reasons for procrastination:

  1. Anxious Procrastination: Where one procrastinates to avoid anxiety associated with starting or completing any task or decision.

  2. Fun Procrastination: Where one would rather be doing anything except that one dreaded task.

  3. Plenty-of-Time Procrastination: Where one finds it difficult to start a project when they know the deadline is a long way off, or, alternatively, has no deadline.

  4. Perfectionist Procrastination: Where the fear of failing, or producing work to a low standard, can be so overwhelming that one never actually gets around to starting anything.

Identifying the type of procrastination one is experiencing at any time is useful to explore solutions and come up with a counter-strategy.

Procrastination

Self-management is the ability to do what you say you commit to doing. It’s the power to control your life and to hold yourself accountable to a standard you have consciously set. It is being able to regulate or moderate your behavior to the standards of society, your own values, and what is associated with personal growth.

Personal transformation and understanding how to break the cycles of bad habits and to finally change your life permanently in a positive way requires self-management.

The key components to practicing self-management are awareness, commitment, consistency, and accountability.

  1. Awareness is the first step of Jay Shetty’s ABC coaching framework and is the foundation of change. Only by being aware and having insight into a problem or opportunity, can one begin to set and implement goals and action steps.

  2. Commitment is the dedication and ability to sustain effort to achieve a desired result with a person or a cause. In a sense, it obligates you to do something to enact change or sustain continuous development.

  3. Consistency is being able to act in the same way in every situation or circumstance based on your commitment and accountability to your goals and values. You are steady and resolute, even under great pressure.

  4. Accountability is a standard of holding yourself responsible for your actions and the outcome. If you are motivated to achieve something worthwhile, you are more likely to be accountable. It is also the third step of Jay Shetty’s ABC coaching framework.

Self-Management

Yomna Yousef is a Supervisor
at Jay Shetty Certification School

References: Wikipedia Contributors (2020). Procrastination. [online] Wikipedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procrastination (edited) 

Dordevic, B. (n.d.). 4 Types of procrastination and how to beat them. Alpha Efficiency. Retrieved from https://alphaefficiency.com/4-types-procrastination-beat/

The Encyclopedia of World Problems & Human Potential. (2016). Procrastination. UIA. Retrieved from http://encyclopedia.uia.org/en/problem/159847

In each issue, we define and explain three key words relevant to our monthly theme. Adaptability, change, and mindset are in the spotlight of this edition.

WISDOM
-PEDIA

Prefer to listen to this article?

A habit, by definition, is a regularly repeated, learned behavior that requires little to no thought. 

All habits are operated by the subconscious mind but developing a habit can either happen consciously or unconsciously.

  1. Unconsciously developed habits are the ones that we develop without paying much attention. They are not necessarily useful, though! They could be stimulated by social programming, unrevised misconceptions, assumptions and, as a result, can be out-of-place, misguided, or wasteful.

  2. Consciously developed habits, on the other hand, are the ones that we deliberately choose to develop, following new awareness, realizations, revelations, and growth. These positive habits stimulate our self-development and ability to serve others.

Habits

Procrastination is the avoidance of doing a task that needs to be accomplished by a certain deadline. It could be further described as a habitual or intentional delay of starting or finishing a task despite knowing it might have negative consequences.

There are four types of or reasons for procrastination:

  1. Anxious Procrastination: Where one procrastinates to avoid anxiety associated with starting or completing any task or decision.

  2. Fun Procrastination: Where one would rather be doing anything except that one dreaded task.

  3. Plenty-of-Time Procrastination: Where one finds it difficult to start a project when they know the deadline is a long way off, or, alternatively, has no deadline.

  4. Perfectionist Procrastination: Where the fear of failing, or producing work to a low standard, can be so overwhelming that one never actually gets around to starting anything.

Identifying the type of procrastination one is experiencing at any time is useful to explore solutions and come up with a counter-strategy.

Procrastination

Self-management is the ability to do what you say you commit to doing. It’s the power to control your life and to hold yourself accountable to a standard you have consciously set. It is being able to regulate or moderate your behavior to the standards of society, your own values, and what is associated with personal growth.

Personal transformation and understanding how to break the cycles of bad habits and to finally change your life permanently in a positive way requires self-management.

The key components to practicing self-management are awareness, commitment, consistency, and accountability.

  1. Awareness is the first step of Jay Shetty’s ABC coaching framework and is the foundation of change. Only by being aware and having insight into a problem or opportunity, can one begin to set and implement goals and action steps.

  2. Commitment is the dedication and ability to sustain effort to achieve a desired result with a person or a cause. In a sense, it obligates you to do something to enact change or sustain continuous development.

  3. Consistency is being able to act in the same way in every situation or circumstance based on your commitment and accountability to your goals and values. You are steady and resolute, even under great pressure.

  4. Accountability is a standard of holding yourself responsible for your actions and the outcome. If you are motivated to achieve something worthwhile, you are more likely to be accountable. It is also the third step of Jay Shetty’s ABC coaching framework.

Self-Management

Yomna Yousef is a Supervisor
at Jay Shetty Certification School

References: Wikipedia Contributors (2020). Procrastination. [online] Wikipedia. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Procrastination (edited) 

Dordevic, B. (n.d.). 4 Types of procrastination and how to beat them. Alpha Efficiency. Retrieved from https://alphaefficiency.com/4-types-procrastination-beat/

The Encyclopedia of World Problems & Human Potential. (2016). Procrastination. UIA. Retrieved from http://encyclopedia.uia.org/en/problem/159847

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