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BILL
PRATT

SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

We speak with Prof. Bill Pratt, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School, about his journey as a coach, and what every new coach should know.

Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

I joined the Jay Shetty Certification School early on, before we created the curriculum! From the start, I admired Jay’s content and his amazing ABC framework, which is the backbone of his approach to coaching and is the core of the curriculum. Jay’s vision and mission are needed in the world today, and the opportunity to be part of something this big was very meaningful. I came back and joined again when they were ready to bring on Coaching Supervisors. I can only coach a limited number of people, but if I can help “train” the next generation of coaches, then the impact on and service to others will go so much further.


What is your coaching approach/niche?

I am a Business and Money coach, so my approach is a little more analytical. While this niche can expand into relationships and other areas after the client gains awareness, I try to not stray too far outside of my area. Business tends to be straight forward, while money does have more delicate nuances, so it takes more energy to coach a money client.


What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

Every new coach needs to know their What, Who, and Why. 


Why is this so important?

Knowing your What lets you realize the type of coaching you want to do (your niche). The Who gets you to identify your target audience(s), which is needed for marketing purposes. The Why is the key motivator that will get you through the tough times, the difficult clients, the slow business periods, the self-doubt, and so forth. Once you figure out these three, then the When, Where, and How will take care of themselves.

Prof. Bill Pratt, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

“It [Supervision] is about meeting the student where they are and guiding them to not only the completion of the program and certification, but most importantly, to where they are a confident and effective coach.”

What are the common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

The most common myth that I see is that life coaches are those people who give great advice. I see and hear so many people get advice from a friend and say, “you should be a life coach.” Maybe they are right, but not because they gave advice to a friend. That is an advisor. Coaching is about asking the right questions, getting to the root of the problem, and helping the client find the right strategies at their pace to move themselves to their next level.


I think the next most common misconception is on the business side. Posting on social media, launching a website, or simply announcing that you are now taking clients is not the path to success. If you are starting your own coaching practice, then you are building a business. There is a lot involved in that process and you will spend more time on the business than the actual coaching for most of your early coaching career.


Finally, I think many people believe they should not choose a niche or a target market because that limits their potential pool of clients and they want to be the coach for everyone. But without a niche, they are actually not the right coach for anyone! A niche is what you want to help people do, the target market is who you want to help in that process. You can do more and help more people as you build up your business, but you still want to start out being known for something rather than forgotten for everything.

What are the common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

I think people just don’t know what it is. Is it teaching? Coaching? Mentoring? Coaching Supervision is really a combination of all of these. It is about meeting the student where they are and guiding them to not only the completion of the program and certification, but most importantly, to where they are a confident and effective coach. Some of that involves teaching, sometimes it is about mentoring, and we are always using our coaching skills along the way. We educate, demonstrate, guide, and support. But the student still has to do the work and remain purposeful in their desire to achieve the certification and serve others.


What is your supervision approach?

I am a college professor by trade, so I strike a balance between gentle encouragement and blunt reality. If I feel a student has done a poor job, then I will tell them where they went wrong, but also encourage them with where they went right. For many of our students, they are the only thing in their own way, and I don’t mind calling them out on that. I do so by pointing out the success and achievements they have already shown and then I show them that their destination is not that far. Think of a running coach pointing out to their client at mile 25 that the marathon is almost over - just 1.2 more miles to go! When you have so much talent and have accomplished so much already, it is a disservice to the world if they do not complete the program, do the work necessary and begin using what they have to serve others.


What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020?

I am such a better coach now than what I was in the beginning because of the students. They have impressed me so much with how dedicated they are to push through despite any obstacles they face and how they go back and review lessons, review their practice sessions, learn about all the tools in the coaching library and so forth. My biggest lesson learned from the students is that despite what the media tells you about the state of humanity and society at this moment, there are hundreds and thousands of individuals out there who are looking to serve, to do what they can to improve the lives of the people around them, and to make the planet even better than how it was when they arrived.

BILL
PRATT

We speak with Prof. Bill Pratt, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School, about his journey as a coach, and what every new coach should know.

SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

I joined the Jay Shetty Certification School early on, before we created the curriculum! From the start, I admired Jay’s content and his amazing ABC framework, which is the backbone of his approach to coaching and is the core of the curriculum. Jay’s vision and mission are needed in the world today, and the opportunity to be part of something this big was very meaningful. I came back and joined again when they were ready to bring on Coaching Supervisors. I can only coach a limited number of people, but if I can help “train” the next generation of coaches, then the impact on and service to others will go so much further.


What is your coaching approach/niche?

I am a Business and Money coach, so my approach is a little more analytical. While this niche can expand into relationships and other areas after the client gains awareness, I try to not stray too far outside of my area. Business tends to be straight forward, while money does have more delicate nuances, so it takes more energy to coach a money client.


What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

Every new coach needs to know their What, Who, and Why. 


Why is this so important?

Knowing your What lets you realize the type of coaching you want to do (your niche). The Who gets you to identify your target audience(s), which is needed for marketing purposes. The Why is the key motivator that will get you through the tough times, the difficult clients, the slow business periods, the self-doubt, and so forth. Once you figure out these three, then the When, Where, and How will take care of themselves.

Prof. Bill Pratt, a supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

“It [Supervision] is about meeting the student where they are and guiding them to not only the completion of the program and certification, but most importantly, to where they are a confident and effective coach.”

What are the common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

The most common myth that I see is that life coaches are those people who give great advice. I see and hear so many people get advice from a friend and say, “you should be a life coach.” Maybe they are right, but not because they gave advice to a friend. That is an advisor. Coaching is about asking the right questions, getting to the root of the problem, and helping the client find the right strategies at their pace to move themselves to their next level.


I think the next most common misconception is on the business side. Posting on social media, launching a website, or simply announcing that you are now taking clients is not the path to success. If you are starting your own coaching practice, then you are building a business. There is a lot involved in that process and you will spend more time on the business than the actual coaching for most of your early coaching career.


Finally, I think many people believe they should not choose a niche or a target market because that limits their potential pool of clients and they want to be the coach for everyone. But without a niche, they are actually not the right coach for anyone! A niche is what you want to help people do, the target market is who you want to help in that process. You can do more and help more people as you build up your business, but you still want to start out being known for something rather than forgotten for everything.

What are the common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

I think people just don’t know what it is. Is it teaching? Coaching? Mentoring? Coaching Supervision is really a combination of all of these. It is about meeting the student where they are and guiding them to not only the completion of the program and certification, but most importantly, to where they are a confident and effective coach. Some of that involves teaching, sometimes it is about mentoring, and we are always using our coaching skills along the way. We educate, demonstrate, guide, and support. But the student still has to do the work and remain purposeful in their desire to achieve the certification and serve others.


What is your supervision approach?

I am a college professor by trade, so I strike a balance between gentle encouragement and blunt reality. If I feel a student has done a poor job, then I will tell them where they went wrong, but also encourage them with where they went right. For many of our students, they are the only thing in their own way, and I don’t mind calling them out on that. I do so by pointing out the success and achievements they have already shown and then I show them that their destination is not that far. Think of a running coach pointing out to their client at mile 25 that the marathon is almost over - just 1.2 more miles to go! When you have so much talent and have accomplished so much already, it is a disservice to the world if they do not complete the program, do the work necessary and begin using what they have to serve others.


What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020?

I am such a better coach now than what I was in the beginning because of the students. They have impressed me so much with how dedicated they are to push through despite any obstacles they face and how they go back and review lessons, review their practice sessions, learn about all the tools in the coaching library and so forth. My biggest lesson learned from the students is that despite what the media tells you about the state of humanity and society at this moment, there are hundreds and thousands of individuals out there who are looking to serve, to do what they can to improve the lives of the people around them, and to make the planet even better than how it was when they arrived.

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