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STUDENT INTERVIEWS

Meet 2 of Our
Recent Jay Shetty
Certified Coaches

Our students are the pride and backbone of the Jay Shetty Certification School. Without their dedication and enthusiasm, we would not be able to fulfill our vision to transform one billion lives. Meet some of our most recent graduates and find out what lights the fire inside them.

If you could use just 1-3 words to describe your essence, what would they be?

Aware, passionate, vibrant


Tell us your story.

When I think back over my life how I was raised, and where I am from, I realized back in 2013 that I've always had a different positive perspective on life. I just never knew how to express it or communicate it properly. I've been told since I was a kid that I'm “called to preach” and be influential to people because of my positive spirit and character. People said there was a higher calling on my life, but no one was ever able to explain to me what that really meant. It was really always “church antics” and feel good quotes driven by an emotional need to feel relevant and “close to God.” 

I began to question people and ask what they meant or even deeper, just simply why they say so. As I got older, I began to question just about everyone and everything and I often got in trouble over it. I was always known as the “happy, nice” person and I truly felt like I was because I learned to laugh throughout life's issues. 


It wasn't until I became an adult with responsibilities, and after my first divorce, that I was faced with some of life's greatest challenges. Being homeless, financially broke, emotionally broke, and even physically broken put me in a place where I was faced with all of the emotional challenges which lead to some chemical imbalances as well. Depression, anxiety and a suicide attempt took me to a new low.  

Remarkably, while attempting to commit suicide, a YouTube video saved my life, which was Eric Thomas’ How Bad Do You Want It, The Guru Story. From that moment on in 2013, I decided that I was going to be okay with being me and learning how to invest in my passions and the things I felt I naturally gravitated toward. So, I lost over 120 lbs., started meditating, sought spiritual awareness, and surrounded myself with other like-minded people. 


When and why did you decide to become a coach?

Around 2015, I had no idea what a life coach was. Since high school, I knew I wanted to be a psychologist, but being young and with responsibilities while making poor choices put me in place where I was in and out of school most of my entire adulthood. In 2015, I decided to quit my job and pursue two of my passions full time, which were personal training and working as a musician. I continued with those for four years, and when I became dissatisfied, I was told by my clients that I would be an amazing life coach. 

So, I went online and took a few courses and received a certification, but to be honest I still was not satisfied. I needed and wanted more. I wanted to be a part of a school that not only challenged me but aided me in my journey to understanding what life coaching really is. And I believe at this time I've finally found it. 

I now know that I want to serve people like myself, people who are stuck but just need a different perspective and a little guidance and motivation to push them into their own possibilities.


Why did you choose the Jay Shetty Certification School?

To be honest, it was all just timing. I have seen other certification schools and taken multiple courses and obtained other certifications, but the way JSCS was presented to me was at the right time and with the right person. COVID happened and I was forced to be home while in desperate need of a change in my life. As I was watching my normal motivational videos, I came across the video with Jay (Shetty) and Tom (Bilyeu) of Impact Theory again. I said to myself, “I really like Jay’s approach and calmness about life.” Then, on Instagram there was an ad for the school and thought “this has to be a sign!” One call from Sean at the enrolment team and I was sold, as the energy was amazing.

How did Jay’s ABCs of Coaching help you personally, as well as with your first practice client during the program?

I keep the ABC pyramid next to me at all times. I used to over-think and stress about sticking to the system from the bottom to the top. What I've learned is that when you are in tune with your client and have a good idea of what they want and need, sometimes you can start right in the middle with the “B’s,” for example, by building habits. I think understanding the pyramid allows room for further and continued coaching sessions. So, my plan with every session is to continue to try and commit them to memory so I will not have to use the paper “cheat sheet.”

Describe your first experience coaching a client during the program, and your most important takeaway from this experience?

The first coaching sessions were amazing! I felt so much more equipped and prepared. I was almost too excited to use what I had learned and was still learning. But what I discovered was to just go with the flow more and have tools and notes ready to help make the session flow more smoothly.

What were your biggest challenges during the program and how did you overcome them?

My biggest challenge was telling myself to not rush the process, to take enough time to do the reflections, read, and watch videos as part of my self-study. I was able to do this by putting myself on a timer after I watched the video lessons. I would set a timer for two hours and dedicate that time only to focus on what I had learned and nothing else. In the process, I repeated what I have learned and how I was going to use it.

How would you now describe your coaching style, or approach?

The foundation of my coaching approach is to be as relatable as possible by comfortably and happily sharing a life experience or story that will help segue into opening up the session so that I am better able to apply active listening and intentional questioning.


Tell us about your future plans. Where do you see yourself 12 months from now?

I aim to have a building that facilitates all three services I plan to offer, which are a gym for personal training, a private office for meditation and life coaching, and a lobby area for entertainment such as speaking arrangements and other performances. I would love to have three to four speaking engagements a month while developing an online community and a school that teaches happiness and purpose.


What is your own definition of coaching at this stage?

Being a coach is helping to establish the foundation of a person’s life. Once you have laid the foundation, you can literally build whatever you want on top of it and ultimately create the best human experience for yourself.


Is there anything else you want to add or tell us?

I would love to mention that I truly love everyone and that, together, we can really create the life and positive world we all want to see.

Meet Our Graduates!

Everyone could use a little more happiness in their lives! We are excited to interview our graduate, Rickey Getwood, Jr., also known as, "Mr. Happy." Rickey is a professional fitness trainer, awareness coach and a best selling author. He has taken communities by storm with his captivating aura of happiness, high-energy inspirations and life-altering awareness messaging. We'd like to invite you to ask Rickey your questions below and we will do our best to answer them during the broadcast. Read more about Rickey's story here: https://shetty.cc/Coaches

Posted by Jay Shetty Certification School on Monday, 13 July 2020

RICKEY GETWOOD JR.

Happiness Transformation Coach

Rickey Getwood Jr
Happiness Transformation Coach

If you could use just 1-3 words to describe your essence, what would they be?

Passionate/energetic, focused, and results-driven.


Tell us your story.

I have always had a passion for helping others.  I guess it started when I was in my late teens coaching community sports and friends with weight training. This “trend” continued into my corporate career as I began to coach and mentor co-workers on how to succeed in the business world. As such, at this point in my career, I have been coaching and mentoring co-workers for over 30 years.


STEVE TOSS

Additionally, I have always been interested in fitness and, as a result, people would often come to me to help them.  In 2002, I became certified as a personal trainer to “put my money where my mouth is.” To me this meant that if I was going to continue helping people, I wanted the credentials to back it up.

I share these examples above not to highlight my accomplishments, but to help illustrate how passionate I am about helping others. I get much personal satisfaction from seeing others succeed.

I am also a huge fan of the “underdog.” I guess that is why the Rocky movies have always been my favorites. One of my favorite quotes of all time is from the 2006 movie, Rocky Balboa.

"…The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place, and I don't care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard you hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward; how much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!"

I think this quote says so much. To me, winning and succeeding are not about a single accomplishment. It is about giving it your all no matter what the outcome.


When and why did you decide to become a coach?

I’ve thought about being a certified coach for a long time.  I have also had so many people tell me over the years that I should quit my job and be a coach. Until recently, though, the timing to formally pursue my certification has not been right. I am now at a juncture in my life where I have decided to take on a new career path and it was the perfect opportunity to get certified and follow my passion.


Why did you choose the Jay Shetty Certification School?

I researched a lot of coaching schools. Jay Shetty really resonated with me. I felt the coaching approach was much more aligned with my style and current approach to helping others, in terms of guiding rather than advising or telling. I also really liked the curriculum, which is a thorough cross-section of formal learning combined with self-study and hands-on learning through supervised coaching.


How did Jay’s ABCs of Coaching help you personally, as well as with your first practice client during the program?

I was shocked how the ABC framework helped me personally. As I studied the framework, I continuously self-reflected. If I was going to guide clients through being aware, auditing themselves, being accountable, and so forth, I needed to do those things myself. Overall, I believe I already did these steps but not to the extent that I do now as a result of the training. I am much more focused on being self-aware, including why am I doing what I’m doing, and why am I feeling like I’m feeling.  This realization has had a tremendous positive effect on me.

From a coaching approach perspective, I love the ABC framework. First, I think it’s very logical, especially as I consider myself a logical person, like many people probably do! But, I am also very intuitive. Using the ABC framework is similar to the approach I’ve historically taken in helping others (which again, is one of the reasons I selected the Jay Shetty Certification School), but just much more formal and structured than my prior approach. 

The framework really makes the coaching process much easier and serves as a great “checklist” to ensure I’m doing all the right things with my clients.  This wasn’t only helpful for my first practice session, but for all my sessions.

Describe your first experience coaching a client during the program, and your most important takeaway from this experience?

I started coaching family members, which was easier in the respect of building trust because I already knew them. However, it was also difficult at the same time, because the pre-existing relationship didn’t necessarily make me as objective as I would be with others. One of the best pieces of feedback I received from my coaching supervisor was to try and coach people unrelated to me.  Once I did that, I felt my formal coaching skills developed much quicker. I was more independent and could objectively apply and further refine my coaching approach.


What were your biggest challenges during the program and how did you overcome them?

Honestly, I cannot say I had many challenges.  When my supervisor recommended that I start coaching non-family members, I thought I was going to have a difficult time finding others to coach, but people were very willing to participate in coaching sessions.

How would you now describe your coaching style, or approach?

I tell people that my personal approach to learning is through a “Socratic” approach. I ask a lot of questions. That is how I learn. I historically used the same strategy when helping others.  People who know me well have learned to never ask me, “What do I do?” They know that my response will be in the form of a question, or several questions such as, “What do you think you should do?” “What have you done/tried so far?” “What’s worked so far?” “What hasn’t been working and why do you think so?”

This approach has benefited others in a couple of ways. First, in knowing I will ask these types of questions, people will often take extra steps before coming to me. Sometimes this has helped them find the answer and they do not even need to come to me after all.  In other situations, they have explored all options and now their discussion with me is different than it would have been.  Now, I am no longer an authoritative figure to them but rather a collaborative partner as we brainstorm together. This is the approach I apply to my coaching.


Tell us about your future plans. Where do you see yourself 12 months from now?

I am throwing myself into my coaching practice a hundred percent. I am hoping this will be my new, full-time career. In 12 months, I am aiming to have established my coaching practice and be starting to build a positive reputation as a coach.


What is your own definition of coaching at this stage?

My aspiration is to be a positive influence on others by guiding people to identify what is truly important to them and the path (steps) to get there, but, at the same time, also to ensure they enjoy the journey through increased self-esteem and ongoing motivation.


Is there anything else you want to add or tell us?

Thank you!  Thank you to everyone in the Jay Shetty Certification School who assisted me through my own journey. As I stated earlier, I have personally grown through the Jay Shetty Certification experience and I cannot wait to help others benefit from my learning!  

Success and Life Coach

Steve Toss
Success and Life Coach

Our students are the pride and backbone of the Jay Shetty Certification School. Without their dedication and enthusiasm, we would not be able to fulfill our vision to transform one billion lives. Meet some of our most recent graduates and find out what lights the fire inside them.

STUDENT INTERVIEWS

Meet 2 of Our
Recent Jay Shetty
Certified Coaches

RICKEY GETWOOD JR.

If you could use just 1-3 words to describe your essence, what would they be?

Aware, passionate, vibrant


Tell us your story.

When I think back over my life how I was raised, and where I am from, I realized back in 2013 that I've always had a different positive perspective on life. I just never knew how to express it or communicate it properly. I've been told since I was a kid that I'm “called to preach” and be influential to people because of my positive spirit and character. People said there was a higher calling on my life, but no one was ever able to explain to me what that really meant. It was really always “church antics” and feel good quotes driven by an emotional need to feel relevant and “close to God.” 

I began to question people and ask what they meant or even deeper, just simply why they say so. As I got older, I began to question just about everyone and everything and I often got in trouble over it. I was always known as the “happy, nice” person and I truly felt like I was because I learned to laugh throughout life's issues. 


It wasn't until I became an adult with responsibilities, and after my first divorce, that I was faced with some of life's greatest challenges. Being homeless, financially broke, emotionally broke, and even physically broken put me in a place where I was faced with all of the emotional challenges which lead to some chemical imbalances as well. Depression, anxiety and a suicide attempt took me to a new low.  

Remarkably, while attempting to commit suicide, a YouTube video saved my life, which was Eric Thomas’ How Bad Do You Want It, The Guru Story. From that moment on in 2013, I decided that I was going to be okay with being me and learning how to invest in my passions and the things I felt I naturally gravitated toward. So, I lost over 120 lbs., started meditating, sought spiritual awareness, and surrounded myself with other like-minded people. 


When and why did you decide to become a coach?

Around 2015, I had no idea what a life coach was. Since high school, I knew I wanted to be a psychologist, but being young and with responsibilities while making poor choices put me in place where I was in and out of school most of my entire adulthood. In 2015, I decided to quit my job and pursue two of my passions full time, which were personal training and working as a musician. I continued with those for four years, and when I became dissatisfied, I was told by my clients that I would be an amazing life coach. 

So, I went online and took a few courses and received a certification, but to be honest I still was not satisfied. I needed and wanted more. I wanted to be a part of a school that not only challenged me but aided me in my journey to understanding what life coaching really is. And I believe at this time I've finally found it. 

I now know that I want to serve people like myself, people who are stuck but just need a different perspective and a little guidance and motivation to push them into their own possibilities.


Why did you choose the Jay Shetty Certification School?

To be honest, it was all just timing. I have seen other certification schools and taken multiple courses and obtained other certifications, but the way JSCS was presented to me was at the right time and with the right person. COVID happened and I was forced to be home while in desperate need of a change in my life. As I was watching my normal motivational videos, I came across the video with Jay (Shetty) and Tom (Bilyeu) of Impact Theory again. I said to myself, “I really like Jay’s approach and calmness about life.” Then, on Instagram there was an ad for the school and thought “this has to be a sign!” One call from Sean at the enrolment team and I was sold, as the energy was amazing.

Rickey Getwood Jr
Happiness Transformation Coach

How did Jay’s ABCs of Coaching help you personally, as well as with your first practice client during the program?

I keep the ABC pyramid next to me at all times. I used to over-think and stress about sticking to the system from the bottom to the top. What I've learned is that when you are in tune with your client and have a good idea of what they want and need, sometimes you can start right in the middle with the “B’s,” for example, by building habits. I think understanding the pyramid allows room for further and continued coaching sessions. So, my plan with every session is to continue to try and commit them to memory so I will not have to use the paper “cheat sheet.”

Describe your first experience coaching a client during the program, and your most important takeaway from this experience?

The first coaching sessions were amazing! I felt so much more equipped and prepared. I was almost too excited to use what I had learned and was still learning. But what I discovered was to just go with the flow more and have tools and notes ready to help make the session flow more smoothly.

What were your biggest challenges during the program and how did you overcome them?

My biggest challenge was telling myself to not rush the process, to take enough time to do the reflections, read, and watch videos as part of my self-study. I was able to do this by putting myself on a timer after I watched the video lessons. I would set a timer for two hours and dedicate that time only to focus on what I had learned and nothing else. In the process, I repeated what I have learned and how I was going to use it.

How would you now describe your coaching style, or approach?

The foundation of my coaching approach is to be as relatable as possible by comfortably and happily sharing a life experience or story that will help segue into opening up the session so that I am better able to apply active listening and intentional questioning.


Tell us about your future plans. Where do you see yourself 12 months from now?

I aim to have a building that facilitates all three services I plan to offer, which are a gym for personal training, a private office for meditation and life coaching, and a lobby area for entertainment such as speaking arrangements and other performances. I would love to have three to four speaking engagements a month while developing an online community and a school that teaches happiness and purpose.


What is your own definition of coaching at this stage?

Being a coach is helping to establish the foundation of a person’s life. Once you have laid the foundation, you can literally build whatever you want on top of it and ultimately create the best human experience for yourself.


Is there anything else you want to add or tell us?

I would love to mention that I truly love everyone and that, together, we can really create the life and positive world we all want to see.

Happiness Transformation Coach

Meet Our Graduates!

Everyone could use a little more happiness in their lives! We are excited to interview our graduate, Rickey Getwood, Jr., also known as, "Mr. Happy." Rickey is a professional fitness trainer, awareness coach and a best selling author. He has taken communities by storm with his captivating aura of happiness, high-energy inspirations and life-altering awareness messaging. We'd like to invite you to ask Rickey your questions below and we will do our best to answer them during the broadcast. Read more about Rickey's story here: https://shetty.cc/Coaches

Posted by Jay Shetty Certification School on Monday, 13 July 2020

STEVE TOSS

If you could use just 1-3 words to describe your essence, what would they be?

Passionate/energetic, focused, and results-driven.


Tell us your story.

I have always had a passion for helping others.  I guess it started when I was in my late teens coaching community sports and friends with weight training. This “trend” continued into my corporate career as I began to coach and mentor co-workers on how to succeed in the business world. As such, at this point in my career, I have been coaching and mentoring co-workers for over 30 years.


Additionally, I have always been interested in fitness and, as a result, people would often come to me to help them.  In 2002, I became certified as a personal trainer to “put my money where my mouth is.” To me this meant that if I was going to continue helping people, I wanted the credentials to back it up.

I share these examples above not to highlight my accomplishments, but to help illustrate how passionate I am about helping others. I get much personal satisfaction from seeing others succeed.

I am also a huge fan of the “underdog.” I guess that is why the Rocky movies have always been my favorites. One of my favorite quotes of all time is from the 2006 movie, Rocky Balboa.

"…The world ain't all sunshine and rainbows. It's a very mean and nasty place, and I don't care how tough you are, it will beat you to your knees and keep you there permanently if you let it. You, me, or nobody is gonna hit as hard as life. But it ain't about how hard you hit. It's about how hard you can get hit and keep moving forward; how much you can take and keep moving forward. That's how winning is done!"

I think this quote says so much. To me, winning and succeeding are not about a single accomplishment. It is about giving it your all no matter what the outcome.


When and why did you decide to become a coach?

I’ve thought about being a certified coach for a long time.  I have also had so many people tell me over the years that I should quit my job and be a coach. Until recently, though, the timing to formally pursue my certification has not been right. I am now at a juncture in my life where I have decided to take on a new career path and it was the perfect opportunity to get certified and follow my passion.


Why did you choose the Jay Shetty Certification School?

I researched a lot of coaching schools. Jay Shetty really resonated with me. I felt the coaching approach was much more aligned with my style and current approach to helping others, in terms of guiding rather than advising or telling. I also really liked the curriculum, which is a thorough cross-section of formal learning combined with self-study and hands-on learning through supervised coaching.


How did Jay’s ABCs of Coaching help you personally, as well as with your first practice client during the program?

I was shocked how the ABC framework helped me personally. As I studied the framework, I continuously self-reflected. If I was going to guide clients through being aware, auditing themselves, being accountable, and so forth, I needed to do those things myself. Overall, I believe I already did these steps but not to the extent that I do now as a result of the training. I am much more focused on being self-aware, including why am I doing what I’m doing, and why am I feeling like I’m feeling.  This realization has had a tremendous positive effect on me.

From a coaching approach perspective, I love the ABC framework. First, I think it’s very logical, especially as I consider myself a logical person, like many people probably do! But, I am also very intuitive. Using the ABC framework is similar to the approach I’ve historically taken in helping others (which again, is one of the reasons I selected the Jay Shetty Certification School), but just much more formal and structured than my prior approach. 

The framework really makes the coaching process much easier and serves as a great “checklist” to ensure I’m doing all the right things with my clients.  This wasn’t only helpful for my first practice session, but for all my sessions.

Steve Toss
Success and Life Coach

Describe your first experience coaching a client during the program, and your most important takeaway from this experience?

I started coaching family members, which was easier in the respect of building trust because I already knew them. However, it was also difficult at the same time, because the pre-existing relationship didn’t necessarily make me as objective as I would be with others. One of the best pieces of feedback I received from my coaching supervisor was to try and coach people unrelated to me.  Once I did that, I felt my formal coaching skills developed much quicker. I was more independent and could objectively apply and further refine my coaching approach.


What were your biggest challenges during the program and how did you overcome them?

Honestly, I cannot say I had many challenges.  When my supervisor recommended that I start coaching non-family members, I thought I was going to have a difficult time finding others to coach, but people were very willing to participate in coaching sessions.

How would you now describe your coaching style, or approach?

I tell people that my personal approach to learning is through a “Socratic” approach. I ask a lot of questions. That is how I learn. I historically used the same strategy when helping others.  People who know me well have learned to never ask me, “What do I do?” They know that my response will be in the form of a question, or several questions such as, “What do you think you should do?” “What have you done/tried so far?” “What’s worked so far?” “What hasn’t been working and why do you think so?”

This approach has benefited others in a couple of ways. First, in knowing I will ask these types of questions, people will often take extra steps before coming to me. Sometimes this has helped them find the answer and they do not even need to come to me after all.  In other situations, they have explored all options and now their discussion with me is different than it would have been.  Now, I am no longer an authoritative figure to them but rather a collaborative partner as we brainstorm together. This is the approach I apply to my coaching.


Tell us about your future plans. Where do you see yourself 12 months from now?

I am throwing myself into my coaching practice a hundred percent. I am hoping this will be my new, full-time career. In 12 months, I am aiming to have established my coaching practice and be starting to build a positive reputation as a coach.


What is your own definition of coaching at this stage?

My aspiration is to be a positive influence on others by guiding people to identify what is truly important to them and the path (steps) to get there, but, at the same time, also to ensure they enjoy the journey through increased self-esteem and ongoing motivation.


Is there anything else you want to add or tell us?

Thank you!  Thank you to everyone in the Jay Shetty Certification School who assisted me through my own journey. As I stated earlier, I have personally grown through the Jay Shetty Certification experience and I cannot wait to help others benefit from my learning!  

Success and Life Coach

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