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New  Habits


Reasons for

NOT STARTING

In an effort to move forward in life and be more productive, we often feel compelled to seek out new ways of ensuring we can repeatedly do things rather than examining our current habits. This quest for new ways requires that we spend time and/or money to develop new habits. But what happens when a new habit does not yield the desired results and we become stressed?

Written by Chris A. Hawkins

Prefer to listen to this article?

Chris A. Hawkins is a Coaching Supervisor
at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

Your habits will determine your future.  

Jack Canfield

Getting Your Habits to Work for You

Less time is spent in using what you know than trying to learn what you do not know. Taking advantage of that thought is as simple as these following steps:

1.    Make a list of habits that you want to work for you.

2.    Write why each habit is important to you. 

3.    Write the obstacles for each habit.

4.    Write what you feel can be changed about each habit.

5.    Discuss your habit(s) with an accountability partner.

6.    Implement the changes in your habits.

7.    Practice your habits.

8.    Create a reward system for each habit that you have held onto and that works for you.

As you apply these eight steps, you should find that habits that have become stale and stuck can be reinvigorated and adapted to get a better end result with less energy and time consumption. Rather than getting yourself into a seemingly endless cycle of trying new things that don’t work, reinvent your current routines with small changes to navigate the bottlenecks. 

To implement a new habit takes considerable energy, because you have to convince yourself there is no way that a current habit will work for you. So, you seek out resources to learn the new habit, including time. Then, you have to hope that it works, or the process may start all over again. Even then, the results you are looking to gain from a new habit may not materialize the way you expected.

In comparison, a habit that you have already been using is embedded in your mind and you know what the effects are as well as how to use it. You need not learn anything new or make new plans to implement something. 

The emotional energy required to utilize a current habit is as simple as practicing what you know or realizing what gets in the way and fixing it.  


#1
Energy Consumption

What is a Habit?

What if I gave you four reasons why holding onto a current habit requires less energy, saves the need to rearrange your busy life schedule, serves as one of the most cost-effective ways of getting everyday things done, and reduces your stress level?  

How can staying with the habits you know actually accomplish all of those things? 

What would your life look like if you removed the thought of focusing on a new habit or set of habits and reviewed what got in the way of your current habits working for you? 

The answers to those questions will vary from person to person but it is all about gaining awareness.

We do not start our lives with habits, they are learned. Many times, this happens through trial and error. We stick with the ones that work and we discard the ones that do not work. Why is it that people are so quick to let a habit go and seek a new habit? Could it be that it seems easier to develop a new habit than to look at what makes a habit not work for us anymore?  

A habit as defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary (2020) is a, “Behavior pattern acquired by frequent repetition or physiologic exposure that shows itself in regularity or increased facility of performance.” This is quite a convoluted way to look at a habit. In short, it is all about doing something over and over again to achieve a desired result.

Here are the four most common reasons why we are reluctant to start a new habit.

Habits make our life routines more accomplishable and lead to the satisfaction of getting things done, even as we squeeze every ounce out of the day. In an already busy life schedule, carving time out of the day to learn something new, rather than replacing something that is designed to make your life more efficient takes time that you may not have. 

If it was a tool that does the work for you like a vacuum cleaner versus a broom, you may gain efficiency. However, learning a new habit takes time and practice. You can admit defeat and trudge to the store to buy a book or two on habits or search the internet for article after article, which also takes time to do. 

However, reviewing your current habits allows the time consumption to be much less as you only need to examine what is getting in the way of a current habit. There is nothing to learn as you do not have to adjust your daily schedule to squeeze in time acquiring resources to learn a habit, create a plan to implement the new habit, and practice the habit.


#2
Rearranging Your Busy Life Schedule

Rather than investing money into discovering and establishing a new habit, simply look at the habits you already have. Yes, you could spend money buying books to learn new habits. Even so, the take-away is that while you could spend your valuable resource of money to develop habits, you could instead save that money to purchase other things that bring you peace, joy and happiness, like a vacation, for instance.

Looking at the habits you already have that do not work allows you to make easy corrections as you become aware of what did not work, and how that knowledge can best serve you, at NO additional cost to you.


#3
Cost-Effective Savings

There is nothing more stressful than trying things and having them not yield the expected results. Learning something new has many variables. Factor in the reason you are trying to learn a new habit that is not just simply about learning something for the sake of learning something.

You are trying to learn a new habit because you want something in your life to change because you perceive a shortfall in accomplishment. As you spend time trying to learn a new way to accomplish something with predictable and consistent results without success, you add to your already growing stress level.

Examining what does not work with a current habit is more about awareness than added stress.


#4
Stress Level Reduction

References: “Habit.” Merriam-Webster.com. 2020. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/habit (10 August 2020).

In an effort to move forward in life and be more productive, we often feel compelled to seek out new ways of ensuring we can repeatedly do things rather than examining our current habits. This quest for new ways requires that we spend time and/or money to develop new habits. But what happens when a new habit does not yield the desired results and we become stressed?

New  Habits


Reasons for

NOT STARTING

Prefer to listen to this article?

Chris A. Hawkins is a Coaching Supervisor
at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

What if I gave you four reasons why holding onto a current habit requires less energy, saves the need to rearrange your busy life schedule, serves as one of the most cost-effective ways of getting everyday things done, and reduces your stress level?  

How can staying with the habits you know actually accomplish all of those things? 

What would your life look like if you removed the thought of focusing on a new habit or set of habits and reviewed what got in the way of your current habits working for you? 

The answers to those questions will vary from person to person but it is all about gaining awareness.

Your habits will determine your future.  

Jack Canfield

What is a Habit?

We do not start our lives with habits, they are learned. Many times, this happens through trial and error. We stick with the ones that work and we discard the ones that do not work. Why is it that people are so quick to let a habit go and seek a new habit? Could it be that it seems easier to develop a new habit than to look at what makes a habit not work for us anymore?  

A habit as defined by the Merriam-Webster dictionary (2020) is a, “Behavior pattern acquired by frequent repetition or physiologic exposure that shows itself in regularity or increased facility of performance.” This is quite a convoluted way to look at a habit. In short, it is all about doing something over and over again to achieve a desired result.

Here are the four most common reasons why we are reluctant to start a new habit.

To implement a new habit takes considerable energy, because you have to convince yourself there is no way that a current habit will work for you. So, you seek out resources to learn the new habit, including time. Then, you have to hope that it works, or the process may start all over again. Even then, the results you are looking to gain from a new habit may not materialize the way you expected.

In comparison, a habit that you have already been using is embedded in your mind and you know what the effects are as well as how to use it. You need not learn anything new or make new plans to implement something. 

The emotional energy required to utilize a current habit is as simple as practicing what you know or realizing what gets in the way and fixing it.  


#1
Energy Consumption

Habits make our life routines more accomplishable and lead to the satisfaction of getting things done, even as we squeeze every ounce out of the day. In an already busy life schedule, carving time out of the day to learn something new, rather than replacing something that is designed to make your life more efficient takes time that you may not have. 

If it was a tool that does the work for you like a vacuum cleaner versus a broom, you may gain efficiency. However, learning a new habit takes time and practice. You can admit defeat and trudge to the store to buy a book or two on habits or search the internet for article after article, which also takes time to do. 

However, reviewing your current habits allows the time consumption to be much less as you only need to examine what is getting in the way of a current habit. There is nothing to learn as you do not have to adjust your daily schedule to squeeze in time acquiring resources to learn a habit, create a plan to implement the new habit, and practice the habit.


#2
Rearranging Your Busy Life Schedule

Rather than investing money into discovering and establishing a new habit, simply look at the habits you already have. Yes, you could spend money buying books to learn new habits. Even so, the take-away is that while you could spend your valuable resource of money to develop habits, you could instead save that money to purchase other things that bring you peace, joy and happiness, like a vacation, for instance.

Looking at the habits you already have that do not work allows you to make easy corrections as you become aware of what did not work, and how that knowledge can best serve you, at NO additional cost to you.


#3
Cost-Effective Savings

There is nothing more stressful than trying things and having them not yield the expected results. Learning something new has many variables. Factor in the reason you are trying to learn a new habit that is not just simply about learning something for the sake of learning something.

You are trying to learn a new habit because you want something in your life to change because you perceive a shortfall in accomplishment. As you spend time trying to learn a new way to accomplish something with predictable and consistent results without success, you add to your already growing stress level.

Examining what does not work with a current habit is more about awareness than added stress.


#4
Stress Level Reduction

Getting Your Habits to Work for You

Less time is spent in using what you know than trying to learn what you do not know. Taking advantage of that thought is as simple as these following steps:

1.    Make a list of habits that you want to work for you.

2.    Write why each habit is important to you. 

3.    Write the obstacles for each habit.

4.    Write what you feel can be changed about each habit.

5.    Discuss your habit(s) with an accountability partner.

6.    Implement the changes in your habits.

7.    Practice your habits.

8.    Create a reward system for each habit that you have held onto and that works for you.

As you apply these eight steps, you should find that habits that have become stale and stuck can be reinvigorated and adapted to get a better end result with less energy and time consumption. Rather than getting yourself into a seemingly endless cycle of trying new things that don’t work, reinvent your current routines with small changes to navigate the bottlenecks. 

References: “Habit.” Merriam-Webster.com. 2020. https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/habit (10 August 2020).

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