For this inaugural issue of Purpose Ed, we speak with
Dr. Joan Swart, Head of Curriculum and Coaching Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

Joan
Swart

Image Credit: Walden University

SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

Following matric, I graduated as a Chemical Engineer and completed an MBA soon after.

I spent the first two decades of my work life in various management roles at big multinational oil, paper, and pulp producers. But I always had a deep interest and penchant for human behavior. I needed to know what motivates people to do what they do and how we can make it more positive.

I joined the M.Sc. Forensic Psychology program at Walden University, earning both my master’s and doctorate degrees. In the process, I consulted and connected with criminals that included a serial killer and mass murderer, juvenile offenders, sex offenders, and armed robbers. But working with victims especially humbled me to the struggles of millions of people affected by violence. 

I have built empathy and resilience to help and guide anyone who wants to try and make themselves and the world they live in better. Today, with the Jay Shetty Certification School, my focus in that direction has only intensified by developing coaches that can help others succeed and grow and spread their skills into their communities, creating a viral effect of support and healing.

Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

The vision of Jay and the Jay Shetty Certification School resonated strongly with my hope to contribute to making the world a better place for everyone. I grabbed a perfect opportunity to work with coaches and supervisors worldwide who strive tirelessly to achieve the same exciting future, binding together and moving forward as a like-minded community to defy the odds of a world that seems increasingly divided.

What is your coaching approach/niche?

My coaching approach follows from my roots in cognitive behavioral science. Cognitive behavioral coaching, or CBC, is increasingly recognized as an effective, evidence-based coaching method designed to change thoughts and feelings in order to improve behavior. Non-goal-directed behavior often follows limiting thinking patterns that result in defeating feelings. Tackling the blocks from both sides yields the best results in removing barriers to improvement. Other than specializing in reducing the limiting effects of trauma, my focus is on leadership, organizational, and personal performance.

What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

You should definitely know yourself. This is one reason why regular journaling and self-reflection are so important. Until you are aware of your own biases, preferences, and fears, you are not able to guide another person effectively.

Why is this so important?

Many of these personal thoughts and beliefs are subconscious, so you may not even be aware of their presence or the impact they have on the strength and outcome of your coaching relationship. You may instinctively reflect judgment or disapproval to your client based on your own experiences, values, and beliefs. This phenomenon is known as transference and may provoke a defensive or oppositional reaction from a client, which is bad for coach-client trust and the cohesion needed to move forward along a joint path. 


What are the common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

The typical mistake that I notice supervisors make is similar to the challenge that new managers have. They often confuse supervision and coaching. It is important to realize that a supervisor guides a coach on how to best coach their clients and how to not place the focus on resolving their own issues. While a part of the development to be a good coach is to grow personally and build the skills and strengths required to guide others, the supervisor’s main role is to improve the interaction between the coach and his or her client and help the coach achieve a better outcome.

What is your supervision approach?

Similar to my coaching style, I subscribe to a cognitive-behavioral supervision approach. I pay close attention to the thoughts, beliefs, and feelings of my student coaches and how they relate to their coaching behavior, including body language, expression, and questioning and listening techniques. Even for coaches, there is a close correlation between their own personality, thoughts, and feelings and the way they motivate and steer their clients. But I also allow each student to develop and practice their own style and own their own unique space, which is important for them to feel comfortable and thrive.

What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020?

Everyone has their own challenges and issues – it is the way and attitude with which you tackle these often-unexpected events that make all the difference. This is why attributes like resilience, hope, and collective strength are the core of creating a workable “new normal.” We are all in an unprecedented situation right now. By stepping back and giving others the space they need while still providing support, everyone has room to grow strong in their own way and come together as a stronger unit.

Dr. Joan Swart is the Head of Curriculum and Head Coaching Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

While a part of the development to be a good coach is to grow personally and build the skills and strengths required to guide others, the supervisor’s main role is to improve the interaction between the coach and his or her client and help the coach achieve a better outcome.

Image Credit: Walden University

What are the common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

In working with clients, prospective coaches, and coaching supervisors, I’ve heard just about every coaching myth out there. But there are three myths that persist and cause confusion for everyone involved.

A coach has to be an expert in the area in which the client seeks help. A coach is there to provide structure and clarity by providing the tools and asking questions that lead to AHA moments for the client. The coach is an expert in the listening, questioning, motivation, and behavioral aspects needed to stimulate the client’s decision-making and problem-solving abilities so that they are always empowered and encouraged to try new ways to grow.

Coaching takes a long time to reflect results. If a coach is well trained in proven, structured methods and techniques, formal sessions do not have to happen frequently or over a long period. The coach provides the tools to the client and teaches him or her to use it themselves. Many clients are surprised by how quickly they start to see results.

A good coach tells clients what to do and gives advice. Not true. An experienced coach is adept at listening and asking questions that lead clients to discover their own solutions. This is a far more empowering approach that motivates clients to stay on their journey of self-improvement and discovery.

Joan
Swart

SUPERVISOR INTERVIEW

For this inaugural issue of Purpose Ed, we speak with Dr. Joan Swart, Head of Curriculum and Coaching Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

Image Credit: Walden University

Following matric, I graduated as a Chemical Engineer and completed an MBA soon after.

I spent the first two decades of my work life in various management roles at big multinational oil, paper, and pulp producers. But I always had a deep interest and penchant for human behavior. I needed to know what motivates people to do what they do and how we can make it more positive.

I joined the M.Sc. Forensic Psychology program at Walden University, earning both my master’s and doctorate degrees. In the process, I consulted and connected with criminals that included a serial killer and mass murderer, juvenile offenders, sex offenders, and armed robbers. But working with victims especially humbled me to the struggles of millions of people affected by violence. 

I have built empathy and resilience to help and guide anyone who wants to try and make themselves and the world they live in better. Today, with the Jay Shetty Certification School, my focus in that direction has only intensified by developing coaches that can help others succeed and grow and spread their skills into their communities, creating a viral effect of support and healing.

Image Credit: Walden University

Why did you decide to join the Jay Shetty Certification School?

The vision of Jay and the Jay Shetty Certification School resonated strongly with my hope to contribute to making the world a better place for everyone. I grabbed a perfect opportunity to work with coaches and supervisors worldwide who strive tirelessly to achieve the same exciting future, binding together and moving forward as a like-minded community to defy the odds of a world that seems increasingly divided.

What is your coaching approach/niche?

My coaching approach follows from my roots in cognitive behavioral science. Cognitive behavioral coaching, or CBC, is increasingly recognized as an effective, evidence-based coaching method designed to change thoughts and feelings in order to improve behavior. Non-goal-directed behavior often follows limiting thinking patterns that result in defeating feelings. Tackling the blocks from both sides yields the best results in removing barriers to improvement. Other than specializing in reducing the limiting effects of trauma, my focus is on leadership, organizational, and personal performance.

What is the most important thing every new coach should know?

You should definitely know yourself. This is one reason why regular journaling and self-reflection are so important. Until you are aware of your own biases, preferences, and fears, you are not able to guide another person effectively.

Why is this so important?

Many of these personal thoughts and beliefs are subconscious, so you may not even be aware of their presence or the impact they have on the strength and outcome of your coaching relationship. You may instinctively reflect judgment or disapproval to your client based on your own experiences, values, and beliefs. This phenomenon is known as transference and may provoke a defensive or oppositional reaction from a client, which is bad for coach-client trust and the cohesion needed to move forward along a joint path. 


What are the common myths or misconceptions about coaching?

In working with clients, prospective coaches, and coaching supervisors, I’ve heard just about every coaching myth out there. But there are three myths that persist and cause confusion for everyone involved.

What are the common misconceptions about coaching supervision?

The typical mistake that I notice supervisors make is similar to the challenge that new managers have. They often confuse supervision and coaching. It is important to realize that a supervisor guides a coach on how to best coach their clients and how to not place the focus on resolving their own issues. While a part of the development to be a good coach is to grow personally and build the skills and strengths required to guide others, the supervisor’s main role is to improve the interaction between the coach and his or her client and help the coach achieve a better outcome.

What is your supervision approach?

Similar to my coaching style, I subscribe to a cognitive-behavioral supervision approach. I pay close attention to the thoughts, beliefs, and feelings of my student coaches and how they relate to their coaching behavior, including body language, expression, and questioning and listening techniques. Even for coaches, there is a close correlation between their own personality, thoughts, and feelings and the way they motivate and steer their clients. But I also allow each student to develop and practice their own style and own their own unique space, which is important for them to feel comfortable and thrive.

What is your biggest lesson learned from the Jay Shetty Certification School students since the doors opened on March 9, 2020?

Everyone has their own challenges and issues – it is the way and attitude with which you tackle these often-unexpected events that make all the difference. This is why attributes like resilience, hope, and collective strength are the core of creating a workable “new normal.” We are all in an unprecedented situation right now. By stepping back and giving others the space they need while still providing support, everyone has room to grow strong in their own way and come together as a stronger unit.

Dr. Joan Swart is the Head of Curriculum and Head Coaching Supervisor at the Jay Shetty Certification School.

While a part of the development to be a good coach is to grow personally and build the skills and strengths required to guide others, the supervisor’s main role is to improve the interaction between the coach and his or her client and help the coach achieve a better outcome.

A good coach tells clients what to do and gives advice. Not true. An experienced coach is adept at listening and asking questions that lead clients to discover their own solutions. This is a far more empowering approach that motivates clients to stay on their journey of self-improvement and discovery.

Coaching takes a long time to reflect results. If a coach is well trained in proven, structured methods and techniques, formal sessions do not have to happen frequently or over a long period. The coach provides the tools to the client and teaches him or her to use it themselves. Many clients are surprised by how quickly they start to see results.

A coach has to be an expert in the area in which the client seeks help. A coach is there to provide structure and clarity by providing the tools and asking questions that lead to AHA moments for the client. The coach is an expert in the listening, questioning, motivation, and behavioral aspects needed to stimulate the client’s decision-making and problem-solving abilities so that they are always empowered and encouraged to try new ways to grow.

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The Jay Shetty Magazine

Dedicated to helping you live your purpose through education. Read Jay Shetty-inspired coaching success stories, trends, and methods to plant the seeds that will transform a billion lives.
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The Jay Shetty Magazine

Dedicated to helping you live your purpose through education. Read Jay Shetty-inspired coaching success stories, trends, and methods to plant the seeds that will transform a billion lives.

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